June 26, 2022

The Spirit of This Place
Rev. Patty Hanneman
Music: Ed Norman, John Moore, Kate Lewis

Our culture has largely succumbed to the individualistic set of responses to the gift of life, easily forgetting questions of the common good. Progressive religion, at its best, seeks to bind us to the whole, to one another through our covenants with one another, and to multi-generational thriving. What does it mean to gather together, to be a “congregation” and to approach religious community as a way of learning to balance giving and receiving?

June 19, 2022

In the Shelter of One Another
Rev. Patty Hanneman
Music: Kate Lewis - piano, Joan Tilghman - cantor

Given the realities of oppression, injustice, and the failures of human beings, what can protect life from harm and repair or restore lives and communities? Progressive religion, at its best, seeks to provide shelter for diverse people in need of healing, transformation, or sustenance during difficult times.  How do we contribute to the struggle for “deliverance from evil?” Our worship associate, Michael Field, will provide a Father’s Day reflection.

About the 2022 Summer Worship Series

This summer will include a series of sermons, loosely based on the book, A House for Hope: the Promise of Progressive Religion for the Twenty-first Century, by John A. Buehrens and Rebecca Ann Parker.

The book uses the metaphor of a house to describe the various pieces of congregational life that give our hopes and dreams shape and meaning. Each Sunday will focus on a different dimension of the house, each of which corresponds to one of the classic issues of progressive theology and congregational life. 

 

 

 

June 12, 2022

Tending the Garden
Rev. Patty Hanneman
Music: Judith Lyon-Mitchell, Kate Lewis

We begin with the earth that supports our house of hope – the home that gives us birth and is our final resting place. Progressive theology affirms that our “salvation” belongs in this world, not the next. How does this affect the way we regard the earth itself and the hope for a life that is just, abundant, and sustainable for all?

Summer Worship Services

This summer will include a series of sermons, loosely based on the book, A House for Hope: the Promise of Progressive Religion for the Twenty-first Century, by John A. Buehrens and Rebecca Ann Parker.

The book uses the metaphor of a house to describe the various pieces of congregational life that give our hopes and dreams shape and meaning. Each Sunday will focus on a different dimension of the house, each of which corresponds to one of the classic issues of progressive theology and congregational life.

  

June 5, 2022

The Tipping Point
Rev. Lisa Garcia-Sampson
In this moment of incredible challenge and hope within our state, our UU faith calls us to interrogate the limits of our imagination for what is possible in 2022. This Sunday, we'll reflect on what's at stake for North Carolina in the current state legislative session and the fall midterm elections, and discern how we can contribute to the transformative movement for justice alive in our state today. This week, we welcome Guest Minister Rev. Lisa Garcia-Sampson. Our Worship Associate is Todd Resly. Music presented by Nellie Galindo, cantor and Kate Lewis, piano.
 
Rev. Lisa Garcia-Sampson serves as the Executive Director of UU Justice NC, The Unitarian Universalist Justice Ministry of North Carolina. In this role, she has the pleasure of working with UU congregations across the state to do justice work spanning racial, economic, immigrant, environmental, electoral justice and more. 
 

May 29, 2022

Carry Something Beautiful
Rev. Patty Hanneman

The philosopher Blaise Pascal wrote, “In difficult times, carry something beautiful in your heart. These are indeed difficult times for many, and times of change for this congregation. They require courage, commitment, hope, and self-love. All of these are sustained by beauty. How do we define beauty, and what will we carry with us into our future?

 

May 22, 2022

To Bless the Space Between Us 

Noticing a  blessing helps us awaken to life's abundant gifts and possibilities, so in a way naming blessings is a way of practicing gratitude. My colleague Rob Eller Issac says that for Unitarian Universalists, blessing is an expression of our partnership with the holy. This Sunday, in Rev. Cayer's last sermon for ERUUF, we'll explore some of the ways we've been in partnership with each other, life, and the holy, and we'll name and give thanks for the abundant gifts discovered along the way. Rev. Deborah Cayer leads this morning's service with Rev. Patty Hanneman and a guest appearance by Rev. Jacqueline Brett. Kate Lewis and Rev. Stacy Grove will provide the music. Pam DiLavore is our cantor.  

 

May 15, 2022

2500 Hours of Love for Racial Equity and Inclusion

In 2021  ERUUF's Board of Trustees created the project, "2500 Hours of Love for Racial Equity and Inclusion" to honor Rev. Deborah Cayer's 25 years in UU ministry. The goal was to get members to pledge at least 2500 hours of learning, skill-building, and volunteer service with Black, Indigenous, and People of Color-led organizations. Join us this morning for a joyous celebration of all that we've learned, and the ways we've served. Ann Verdine-Jones and Beth Harvat, project co-chairs, co-lead the service with Rev. Cayer. Member reflections by Lisa Jones, Clint McSherry, and Mary Mehrer. Ed Norman and Friends bring American roots music, and an ERS ensemble reprises "2500 Hours of Love."  A reception with tasty treats follows the service.  

May 8, 2022

Reproductive Justice
Rev. Deborah Cayer
Music: Sally Franz - flute; Kate Lewis - piano; Joan Tilghman - cantor

Fifty years ago the US Supreme Court ruled that women had the right to choose what happened within their bodies and now a majority of voters agree with that decision. And yet this past week we've learned that a handful of US Supreme Court judges plan to reverse that ruling, thereby formally taking away civil rights from at least half of the nation's citizens. What grounding does Unitarian Universalism offer us as we wrestle with these complicated, sometimes difficult personal and political issues?

 

May 1, 2022

Drawing Our Circle Wide
Rev. Jacqueline Brett
Music: Richard Clark-cello, Paul Baerman-oboe, Kate Lewis-piano; Eno River Singers, and Pam DiLavore, cantor

This Sunday we celebrate and affirm the 57 new members who joined ERUUF since March 2020. A full 54 joined virtually, with most having never been to ERUUF prior to the pandemic. Join us as we draw our circle of belonging wider with a joyous welcome. And, we'll also conduct a bridging ceremony to affirm beloved high school seniors Kathryn Adams and Alex Hartman who will graduate this year. Worship participants include Alice Alexander, Kathryn Adams, Jay Giles, Nicholas Yates, Nicole Yates, and Betsy Sprouse.

April 24, 2022

Earth Day: Living into the Future We Can Choose
Rev. Jacqueline Brett, Earth Justice Action Group Worship Associates: Betsy Bickel, Lila Rosa, and Cheryl Turney
Music: Jewelsong and Kate Lewis, Piano

On this Earth Day Sunday we acknowledge the current crisis state of our planet, and the opportunities we have to choose a more hopeful future. Directly after the service all are invited by the Earth Justice Action Group to the Fellowship Hall for a plant-based lunch in celebration of ERUUF's recent UUA Green Sanctuary accreditation.

April 17, 2022

Easter
Rev. Jacqueline Brett with Reverends Deborah Cayer, Daniel Trollinger and Stacy Grove
Music: Eno River Singers, Jocelyn Neal - cantor, Kate Lewis - piano
This Sunday we gather as "children born of Earth's desiring," in person for the first time in two years for a glorious celebration of Easter in beloved community, and with it, a convergence of other holidays and celebrations during this season of lovely spring come to life. We will share in a flower communion and invite all to contribute a flower from your garden or elsewhere and leave with the beautiful gift of someone else's flower. Our service will complete with Handel's Hallelujah Chorus, which all are invited to join in with the Eno River Singers. 
 

April 10, 2022

This Old World
Rev. Deborah Cayer

There's a hymn from the Southern Harmony hymn book that's in our UU hymnal too, even though we don't sing it very often. The "cheerful" first line goes, "This old world is full of sorrow, full of sickness, weak and sore..."  What do you do when you encounter suffering?  This Sunday before Easter, we'll contemplate the world's sorrow, and our own, and consider ways to respond. Music by ERUUF's River Folk; Pam DiLavore, cantor; Kate Lewis, piano.